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Respiratory Protective Equipment (RPE) is essential gear for protecting you from inhaling hazardous substances. In this blog, we’ll explore the important role of RPE, whether you are dealing with airborne contaminants like asbestos, fumes, or dust, RPE is an essential protective equipment (PPE) that makes sure you can breathe safely. Join us as we deep dive into the different types of RPE, their applications, and how they can protect you from potential health risks.

Before you even get started with RPE, make sure you have other practical control measures in place first; such as local exhaust ventilation or direct dust-extracted tools with a vacuum catchment to get rid of the majority of contaminants in the air. You should also be keeping an eye on your team’s health and workplace conditions to ensure that, over time, they aren’t being made sick or getting injured by their work.

Remember, there is no such thing as a healthy dust, even if you are outside!

We’ve gone ahead and put together a quick guide of factors to consider when providing your workers with RPE.

Types of RPE

Dust masks are basically the bottom of the list of ways to protect yourself, we would not recommend using these as they are mostly ineffective at creating a seal between you and the contaminants.

Respirators use replaceable filters to remove contaminants to clean the air for the wearer. They come in half-face and full-face versions. The cartridge filters are specific to certain types of contaminants, ask your manufacturer exactly which cartridge you should be using for the respirator you have and the contaminants you will be facing.

 

Remember if you have stubble or any facial hair you may not be getting the seal and the protection you think you are! So if you love your beard as much as your lungs read on to find out what you can do.

half and fulled face RPE

Powered air purifying respirators (PAPRs)

Are made up of headgear and fan assembly that take contaminated air, filters it, and then delivers the clean air to the user. These are also known as positive pressure systems. These not only keep you nice and cool, but offer the highest protection there is for people who have facial hair. Something to note with these is that the visors and headset can be impact rated if you need it, and don’t fog up because of the airflow

PAPR RPE

Supplied air respirators

Provide a supply of clean air to the wearer from a source such as an air compressor or cylinder. It’s important to note that the air supply needs to be checked regularly to make sure that it is safe to use – just think about what you see coming out of your air compressor when you release the valve under the air tank! The user must also be trained in how to use the system. If using these RPE’s you need to notify WorkSafe.

BA RPE system

Using RPE

It’s important for your workers to visually check their RPE for signs of damage before each use to identify any issues, including whether it needs to be cleaned or decontaminated.

Make sure your team keep their RPE on while working in the hazardous area. Removing it for even a short period of time is a risk to their health.

Did you know that they come in different sizes? One size does not fit all!

If your workers are using RPE then make sure they are fit tested, this way you will know who needs what size, otherwise it may not work and give the protection your workers need.
The manufacturer of the RPE can tell you who can do this testing.

There are two checks which you need to do each time you use and RPE:
1 – check for damage visually to the sealing surfaces and straps
2 – check the valves are functioning correctly like WorkSafe images below

How to check RPE using hands

Image Source: Worksafe New Zealand

Keep in mind that if your worker’s safety glasses fog up while they are wearing a half-face respirator, this is a sign that there is a leak at the top of the respirator which means they are not getting full protection.

Life Shavers: Shaving your beard could save your life

When your workers are wearing respiratory protective equipment at work, they must be clean shaven to ensure it is forming a seal and protecting them from breathing in hazardous materials. Even a small amount of stubble can prevent RPE from sealing correctly which means your workers will still be inhaling harmful materials which may cause health concerns. A clean shave goes hand in hand with the correct RPE for the job.

It’s your legal responsibility to monitor your workers’ health. Make sure that you are completing regular Site Reviews on the HazardCo App, as this will help you to identify potential hazards and put effective plans in place. Your HazardCo Support Team is available throughout the day to guide you through this – call 0800 555 339 to talk it over.

Facial hair styles that work with RPE

Image Source: Worksafe

Exposure to silica dust has been spotlighted as one of the major risks to workers in the construction industry. According to 1 NEWS, more than 100 enforcement actions have been taken against Kiwi businesses since alarms were raised in Australia, where there have been several deaths from silica dust.

What is silica dust?

Great question! Silica dust (crystalline silica) is found in some stone, rock, sand, gravel, and clay. You’ll mostly come across it in the following products:

When these materials are worked on, a fine dust is released known as respirable crystalline silica or silica dust. And it’s this dust that is harmful when inhaled into your lungs.

How can workers be exposed to silica dust?

You may be exposed to silica dust if your work involves:

Are there significant health risks?

Yes, and they can be serious if the right precautions aren’t taken. Silica dust is 100 times smaller than a grain of sand, you can be breathing it in without even knowing it.

Workers may develop a series of lung diseases from breathing in silica dust, including silicosis, lung cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. There is also some evidence that exposure to the dust may cause kidney disease.

What can be put in place on-site to mitigate the risks?

To follow health and safety laws, businesses should eliminate or minimise exposure to hazards by controlling the risks. For silica dust, this can be done in many ways:

Isolate work areas: Use physical barriers or computer numerical control (CNC) machines.
Look for dust control features: When buying equipment ensure dust-generating equipment has a dust collection system with a filtered air supply.
Use a H-class vacuum cleaner: Workers should not be using household vacuums to remove dust.
Set up exclusion zones: Mark the boundaries of work areas where dust is created. The signs should warn workers and specify the PPE to be used.
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE): PPE should not be the first or only control measure you consider but should be used. Seek expert advice when choosing it and consult with the worker who will be using it.
On-tool extraction: Use Local Exhaust Ventilation (LEV) that fits directly onto the hand-held machines. This is one of the most effective ways of controlling dust.
Water suppression: To be used when LEV is not suitable. Water should be used through non-electric tools to wet dust down at the point of dust generation. Also, make sure equipment and work areas are cleaned regularly with water.
Respiratory (breathing) protection: The type of respirator you choose will depend on the job and the levels of toxicity. Always choose a respirator that fully protects the worker and carry out fit testing so it is sealed tightly against the face.
Exposure and health monitoring: Provide health monitoring for all your workers who may be exposed to silica dust. You can engage with an occupational health practitioner at Habit Health – HazardCo customers even get a special discount.
Training: Health and safety starts with educating your workers. Provide them with information, training, and instruction on the control measures and the potential health impacts.

Remember employers are required to ensure the health and safety of their workers and others at their workplace, and have a duty to control the risks associated with the job.

At HazardCo, we’re all about education and equipping workers with the knowledge they need to get home safe at the end of the day. Educating everyone on-site about the danger and what we can do to reduce them creates a healthier worksite for everyone.

If you have any questions or want to know more about how to protect your team, get in touch today.

The workplace hazards that create risks of harm to psychological (mental) health are known as psychosocial hazards. These hazards, when excessive or prolonged, can cause serious harm.  It can have a significant impact on workers, their families and business.

Mental health problems are common, with nearly one in two New Zealanders likely to meet the criteria for a mental illness at some time in their lives. Workplaces that prioritise mental health have better engagement, reduced absenteeism and higher productivity, while people have improved wellbeing and greater morale.

Psychosocial hazards can come from:  

  • Work relationships and interactions, including bullying, harassment, discrimination, aggression and violence
  • The way the work or job is designed, organised and managed
  • The equipment, working environment or requirements to undertake duties

What are some of the work-related factors that affect a mentally healthy work site?

  • Work-related violence and aggression
  • Workplace bullying
  • Poor support
  • Lack of recognition and reward
  • Low role clarity
  • Poor organisational justice
  • Remote and isolated work

Whose responsibility is it to manage psychosocial hazards?

Workplaces have a legal responsibility to manage risks to mental health and wellbeing just like they do any other health and safety risk.
Knowing where to start can feel overwhelming but getting started doesn’t have to be. Take action to improve the mental health of your team today.

Tips to help build and maintain a mentally healthy work site: 

  • Create a more positive and supportive work site. 
    • Develop an action plan in consultation with your workers about what you can do together.
    • Check in on your workers regularly. Start a genuine conversation. Ask your worker how they are going, and listen.
    • Encourage respectful behaviour and communication.
    • Walk the talk and lead by example. Supervisors demonstrate their commitment by being supportive and positive on site.
    • Show your commitment by supporting mental health organisations and getting involved in awareness events.
    • Reinforce the good behaviours regularly and address bad behaviours as they appear.
    • Commit to zero tolerance for bullying, discrimination and violence/aggression.
    • Encourage and support employees to bring up concerns when they notice unacceptable behaviours.
  • Establish awareness and support for workers experiencing mental health issues.
    • Consistently raise awareness about mental health and well-being by having discussions such as 1:1 chats and tool box talks.
    • Share information with your workers on mental health and how to seek help to help break the stigma. Posters, emails, and discussions can all be used.
    • Encourage staff with mental health conditions to seek treatment and support early.
    • Support staff with mental health conditions to stay at or return to work.
  • Celebrate workers and their efforts.
    • Praise employees and give regular positive feedback for good work.
    • Celebrate team success. A morning tea / BBQ is also great for team bonding.
  • Take steps to improve role clarity and job satisfaction
    • Monitor and manage workloads regularly and increase input in how workers do their work.
    • Have ongoing and regular conversations with employees about their performance and behaviour.
    • Make sure your employees are clear about their roles. Position description, regular 1:1 catchups and reviews.
    • Offer opportunities for learning, problem-solving and personal development.
    • Support learning – provide opportunities for workers to learn and sharpen their skills, and set interesting challenges.

If you have challenges on your work site related to psychosocial hazards, give us a call for advice. As a HazardCo member you can have a chat with the experienced health and safety Advisory Team for no extra cost.

Lithium batteries are common in everyday life and on the worksite, their lightweight, long life, interchangeability and quick charge benefits mean that they are now used in everything from laptops to power tools to EVs. But did you know that they pose a significant risk and need to be a part of your health and safety plan?

What’s the risk?

Lithium batteries of all sizes have the potential to overheat and catch fire. The fire is hotter, harder to put out and the smoke from these fires is incredibly toxic. Lithium batteries generally overheat if they get wet, damaged or are used with incorrect charging equipment.

Damaged batteries can explode at any time giving off flames that burn anywhere between 500 and 1000 degrees celsius. These fires are very difficult to extinguish as both water and CO2 will only suppress the fire, not extinguish it. Even if the fire has been suppressed it can still ignite again if the battery still contains energy to burn. Lithium batteries are also prone to thermal runaway, which is where one small fault can spread quickly through the battery causing a rapid increase in temperature and potential explosion.

Because of this, lithium batteries need to be properly cared for according to the manufacturer’s instructions to minimise the risk, aside from that, you need a plan in place in case of a fire.

Hot tip: The bigger the battery the bigger the risk of fire and explosion because of the increase in stored energy being released, think energy in = energy out almost instantly so take extra care with larger battery packs – like the ones in your hand held power tools. 

Ways to minimise the risk:

Safe lithium battery disposal

Never dispose of Lithium batteries in general rubbish as it can result in a fire in your bin or on the way to a transfer station, creating a risk to those transporting them. The manufacturer should be able to advise safe disposal or check out your local battery recycling centre.

Lithium batteries are going to continue playing a crucial role in our workplaces and lifestyles, so it’s necessary to recognize the potential hazards associated with them. By having awareness of these risks and good practices, we can work together to reduce the potential dangers, resulting in safer working environments where Lithium batteries are used.

If you have any questions, give the Hazardco team a call today!

What are Musculoskeletal Disorders?

A musculoskeletal disorder is any pain felt in the muscles, bones, ligaments, tendons, blood vessels or nerves. You can feel this pain in just one area of the body, or throughout your whole body. The pain can range from mild to severe enough to interfere with your day-to-day life. 

The Data

Trades workers have had the highest number of claims by occupation. According to ACC data Ligament, tendon and muscle injuries (also known as Musculoskeletal Disorders or MSDs) made up 65% of all claims. It is the most common type of injury where someone requires more than a week off work, a whopping 1,590 injured construction worker incidents were logged with WorkSafe between Jun22 and May23.

Strains and Sprains in the Construction Industry

The residential construction industry is currently booming and subsequently the ACC claim numbers and payout costs for strains and sprains are also increasing. There are numerous factors which increase the risk of musculoskeletal injuries, these include time pressure, ageing workforces and unsafe lifting techniques. 

We need to change the mindsets of workers thinking that “pain and injury is unavoidable” and make our younger workforce understand the combined impacts of repeated injuries – something that more experienced builders know very well.

 It is well known that there are a range of factors that contribute to MSDs. It’s not just about a single factor such as the lifting technique (although for industries such as scaffolding and roofing, lifting and handling techniques are an important factor).

The research firmly points to five groups of factors we need to tackle when addressing MSDs in construction as shown in the diagram below these are work organisation, environmental, individual, psychological, biomechanical and physical factors:

infographic on causes of discomfort pain & injury

It may not surprise you that physical factors often take most of the blame as their connection is easy to understand, measure and observe. There are also proven strategies to overcome physical factors such as machinery, equipment and task modifications. 

Understanding how these factors can combine and influence each other to cause problems will be crucial. Working together and combining solutions to them in your approach is where the construction industry will get the most benefit. 

 The most common solutions for some of the above risk factors are:

 

We dive deeper into what treatment might look like, prevention tips, and the unseen costs associated with MSD in the blogs below: 

Musculoskeletal what treatments might look like and prevention tips

5 things you can do to tackle musculoskeletal problems MSDs in your business

Musculoskeletal the hidden costs to workers lives and businesses

 

If you need anymore information get in touch with the HazardCo team.

Proper management of hazardous substances on-site is important to keep everyone and our environment safe. 

Legally speaking, hazardous substances refer to substances which have any of the following properties:

If you are using any hazardous substance in the workplace you need to make sure they are stored, used, transported and disposed of correctly, which will help to reduce the risk to anyone who uses or comes into contact with them.

To capture what hazardous substances you are using you must by law have a hazardous substance register along with the relevant safety data sheet (SDS).

What is a Hazardous substance register?

This is a list of all your hazardous substances (including hazardous waste) that is used, handled, or stored at any of your sites. Having a register will ensure you know the substances you have on-site, the safety measures you need to follow, and what to do in case of an emergency.

Keeping a Hazardous substance register

Keeping your register in a central location on your site means that in case of an emergency, it can be accessed quickly by anyone who needs it. 

Here are some key bits of information that need to be included on your register: 

Not only do you need the information above, but you must also make sure that the register is up to date and available on-site. 

As the register represents the maximum amount of the substance held, it means it’s not going to be a daily task to keep it up-to-date. But if the maximum quantity changes, the register needs to reflect this. We recommend that you review your register each time you make a change to ensure it’s up to date and accurate.

How do I create a hazardous substance register?

Creating your hazardous substance register is made much simpler with our Hazardous Substances Register, HazardCo members can access this via the HazardCo Hub in the templates section. 

Safety Data Sheet (SDS)

The purpose of a safety data sheet (SDS) is to provide key information about hazardous substances to the people who handle, use or store them or who could be exposed to them. 

An SDS tells you 

Remember it is the business owner’s responsibility to have an up to date SDS for each hazardous substance and make sure that their workers have access to it. The SDS must be less than 5 years old. 

If you need a hand getting started with your hazardous substances register or would like more information, get in touch with the friendly HazardCo team today – we’re always happy to help.

When it comes to construction sites, ensuring the health & safety and wellbeing of everyone on-site is the top priority. It’s more than just wearing hard hats and high-vis vests. It involves careful planning and preparation of the specific needs, hazards and risks of each project. That’s where Site-Specific Safety Plans (SSSPs) come into play.

A SSSP is a detailed roadmap designed to ensure everyone stays safe from start to finish. It identifies the hazards, how you will minimise the risks, sets clear guidelines, and helps to create a culture of safety on-site.

Setting up health and safety with HazardCo Projects is quick and simple. All you need to do is log in to the HazardCo Hub and “create a Project”. You receive the completed SSSP straight away while the physical scan-in board will be sent out for you to display on-site.

Not only does HazardCo’s Project save you time at the start of your project, it saves time for everyone on the site. Once the project starts, everyone entering the site inducts themselves on-site using the QR code on the site scan-in board, and the QR scanner in the free HazardCo App. That’s right, everyone inducts themselves using their smartphone, no lengthy induction meetings or paperwork required, and you get a record of every completed induction too.

It’s important to get everyone on board including your subbies!

Make sure you request a Task Analysis from each of your contractors so you can include their Hazards and controls in your SSSP. This will help ensure you and others on site are well informed of all the hazards from start to end of the project.

Share the SSSP with the team. Anyone scanning into the site using your QR code and the HazardCo App will have immediate access. Every worker who sets foot on-site needs to know and understand the SSSP. This can be done during the site induction, where the workers learn about the project, potential hazards, and safety protocols, which they can do using the App. If you need more information on working with contractors you can check out this blog

Why Go Digital?

While there’s no one-size-fits-all approach to creating a SSSP, using digital tools like HazardCo can offer great time saving and streamlining benefits. Among many other benefits of using HazardCo, using it for SSSP means that you have:

Going digital with the HazardCo App means information flows more efficiently and this allows your teams to better collaborate with one another.

So, whether you’re building a multi residential, a new build or doing a big reno, remember: safety first, always. And with a solid SSSP in place, you’re one step closer to a successful and safe construction project.

For health and safety sorted in a flash, right from the very start of your new build, look no further than HazardCo Projects. It’s the smart way to maintain a safe site and have more time to focus on the job at hand. 

If you would like to discuss your upcoming project please give our team a call on 0800 555 339.

When it comes to working safely at heights, make sure you’re eating a pie every Sunday. Wait…what?

Yep, you heard that right. 

Remember the phrase: Every Sunday I Eat A Pie. It’s a handy way to remember the steps for staying safe: Eliminate, Substitute, Isolate, Engineer, Administrative, and PPE. These steps help you figure out what safety measures to use when you’re working at heights

Aangoram of Every Sunday I Eat  A Pie

No matter the height you are working at, you have to make sure that you are controlling the risks, it doesn’t matter if that work is 40mm from the next surface or 40m.

Just like people argue about the best flavour of pie, there are different ways to working safely at heights, choosing the best methods such as the following examples of controls will be based on your specific situation, and the work being carried out. .

Eliminate: Not everything that needs doing has to be done “up there”. What tasks can be done on the ground before you have to do it at height?  Every step achieved where you don’t have a risk of dropping objects is a reduction of other things to concentrate on when at height.

Substitute: What other methods can be used to get to the workspace? Instead of a ladder could you use a scaffold? MEWPs (like scissor lifts & boom lifts) can be really handy here, not only with safe access but also with making it easier on your body to get there and work all day.

Isolate: This means to physically prevent the contact between you and the risk (falling or even dropped objects etc) this can come in the form of guardrails, scaffolding, or nets to prevent things or people from falling to lower levels.

Engineer: This is a more permanent solution, think of your handrails on staircases or cleverly built seats with high backs around the edges of a raised deck. It’s built for purpose and will continue to deliver that outcome without you having to interact with it (passive protection) this is often referred to as safety in design.

Administrative: This is simply making people aware. Think about hazard boards, signs, warnings, toolbox talks or paperwork to communicate what you will be doing, how, and who is doing it when.

PPE: This is the likes of harnesses to prevent you getting to a place you can even fall if possible, and if you do fall then to lessen the severity of the injuries you would receive from a fall if set up correctly, a hard hat to protect your head from small items falling like screws and small items etc.

Remember consistency is key

It’s important you and your team are actively involved in ensuring any work carried out at heights, is done in the safest way possible. Empower your team to speak up, highlight unsafe working situations or practices, and swiftly act to handle them. 

We recommend doing a Task Analysis to put a plan in place to manage the risks involved with working at height. This will help you decide whether it’s possible to eliminate the risk of falling from height or what the most effective control/s are to minimise the risk. 

So from the above, what’s your favourite flavour combinations? Which ones will satisfy your cravings to keep the team safe today?

If you’ve got a question about working at height or any other health and safety matter, the HazardCo Advisory Team is here to help. Give them a call on 0800 555 339

 

Over the last 18 months, consents for multi-unit dwellings have grown to the point where there are more multi-unit consents each month than for standalone houses. Coupled with the current economic climate and the security that comes from Council, Kainga Ora or Government work means we are seeing more and more of our residential builders starting to work beyond the more traditional single dwelling build.

How do you define Multi-Dwelling Housing?

There are three different types of residential housing – low density, medium density, and high density.

 

With increasing pressure on New Zealand’s building stock, medium density housing is considered an attractive option to meet the changing housing needs. Demand for more compact homes is increasing, particularly in areas with rapid population growth (BRANZ, 2023). Multi- dwelling consents made up 48% of all consents in 2021 and were forecasted to continue to increase (Stats NZ, 2021).

What’s the difference?

The key difference between low and multi dwelling housing is the level of complexity required to manage the build and the likelihood of additional layers of responsibility e.g. directors and development owners as PCBU’s above the building contractor.

This complexity of communication around safety means that the builds are often not solely run by a Group Home Builder or single builder and their subbies. Instead, for example, they can be run by project management companies, involving large stages of the build process that is then run and managed by specialists. This adds additional complexities compared to low density housing.  

There are often complex stages of these builds, which are generally run by specialised subbies e.g. planning (engineers, architects, quantity surveyors), and build stages (civil works, construction management, carpentry/joiners, concreting) etc.   

Multi-dwelling Residential Requirements

Because multi-dwelling housing creates more risk on-site due to the increased amount of subbies, machinery, equipment, and high-risk work taking place, It’s important that you have the right H&S tools in place for your contractors and a safe system of work e.g Site Specific Safety Plan (SSSP) for all medium density builds.

A SSSP for a multi-dwelling build will outline how all involved parties will manage health and safety on-site. This includes a detailed agreement between parties on how they will manage subbies, their expectations, roles, and responsibilities to ensure that all relevant site safety information is available.

The SSSP is intended to be a detailed agreement and communication tool. Due to the potential complexity of multi-dwelling builds, we always recommend a more detailed and customised SSSP.

The extra complexities that can need extra planning and control include:

This list is not exhaustive but all of these complexities are often above and beyond a low density build and need planning, controlling, and communicating to ensure the health and safety of workers and others are managed well. 

Got a new multi-dwelling build kicking off?

Project Pro and the HazardCo system are suitable and capable of meeting the H&S requirements of multi-dwelling builds, so you can feel confident that HazardCo can support you as your business grows. 

If you are a builder starting to diversify, now’s the right time to review your Health and Safety activity. 

That’s where HazardCo comes in. If you’re building 3 or more dwellings within a fenced-off section, you will need HazardCo’s Project Pro. This is a customised project, specifically for your build that gives you everything you need for your team and all the subcontractors you will have coming onto the site. 

Here are some key components of Project Pro that will help you cover all your bases.

  1. 2 x Hazard Board with QR code
  2. Customised SSSP for the project (reviewed by a H&S Advisor)
  3. Large HazardCo mesh fence banner
  4. Full access to the HazardCo system to guide anyone scanning onto site 
  5. In app guided activity to support learning
  6. Cloud storage of all safety documentation completed on site
  7. Reporting and analytics to identify opportunities and trends on site
  8. Support from our Customer support and Advisory teams

If you have a new multi-dwelling residential project kicking off, give us a call on 0800 555 339  or email info@hazardco.com to discuss your requirements and what you need to be thinking about from a H&S perspective and the added complexities that come with it.

For building companies, scalability isn’t just a buzzword – it’s a necessity. Paul Dugdale of ARCA and Dale Spencer of Southern Ocean Building and Consulting, are shedding light on the importance of systems and technology when it comes to running an efficient, successful building company. Let’s dig into some key lessons from these experts. 

Lesson 1: Find the right people 

Getting the right people on board and equipping them with the right tools and systems is the first step in scaling your business. To do this, identify bottlenecks in your existing processes and work out how to relieve these through either automation, delegation, or elimination. Being proactive and identifying what the critical points are in your business and making sure these run smoothly is a great way to make your business more efficient. 

Lesson 2: Get on top of your financial forecasting 

Knowing exactly where you are and if you are on track (or not) with your budgets is key to making sure your business succeeds. Being able to forecast to identify any problems, allows you to make changes to manage these. The best way to do this is to use integrated software that gives you oversight across your business and can also make financial forecasting more efficient which saves you time and frees you up to work on other parts of your business. 

Lesson 3: Systemise your business

At the heart of scalability lies the ability to use software and systems to improve efficiency. The key is to use simple systems that offer both high-level overviews and can also easily drill down into the details, empowering the right people to make informed decisions quickly and easily. 

Lesson 4: Embrace the suffering

Running a business is hard! And even our experts admit that there’s always something that pops up to keep you on your toes. Having the confidence to know that whatever tomorrow brings because you have created strong and resilient systems in your business you will be able to deal with those problems, gain knowledge from them and create a strategy to fix them, will mean that you will continue to build a successful business. 

Remember you can’t do it all so finding the right way to do it is the key to success. 

Watch the full video to discover the systems and integrations that Paul and Dale have used to successfully scale and take their business to the next level.

Man wearing full faced RPE
Respiratory Protective Equipment (RPE) is essential gear for protecting you from inhaling hazardous substances. In this blog, we’ll explore the important role of RPE, whether you are dealing w...
Stacked blocks on engineered stone containing silica dust
Exposure to silica dust has been spotlighted as one of the major risks to workers in the construction industry. According to 1 NEWS, more than 100 enforcement actions have been taken against K...
Female construction worker sitting with head in hand
The workplace hazards that create risks of harm to psychological (mental) health are known as psychosocial hazards. These hazards, when excessive or prolonged, can cause serious harm.  It ca...
Lithium Battery with drill and screws
Lithium batteries are common in everyday life and on the worksite, their lightweight, long life, interchangeability and quick charge benefits mean that they are now used in everything from lap...
worker holding injured hand
What are Musculoskeletal Disorders? A musculoskeletal disorder is any pain felt in the muscles, bones, ligaments, tendons, blood vessels or nerves. You can feel this pain in just one area o...
Large container of Hazardous Substances with warning labels on them
Proper management of hazardous substances on-site is important to keep everyone and our environment safe.  Legally speaking, hazardous substances refer to substances which have any of the f...
worker using a machine to bore into the ground
When it comes to construction sites, ensuring the health & safety and wellbeing of everyone on-site is the top priority. It's more than just wearing hard hats and high-vis vests. It involv...
Scaffolding in a construction site
When it comes to working safely at heights, make sure you’re eating a pie every Sunday. Wait…what? Yep, you heard that right.  Remember the phrase: Every Sunday I Eat A Pie. It's a handy...
Image of Multi- dwelling housing on hill
Over the last 18 months, consents for multi-unit dwellings have grown to the point where there are more multi-unit consents each month than for standalone houses. Coupled with the current econ...
For building companies, scalability isn't just a buzzword – it's a necessity. Paul Dugdale of ARCA and Dale Spencer of Southern Ocean Building and Consulting, are shedding light on the importa...
New digital construction software can give tradies the edge they have been looking for by giving them the opportunity to run their jobs more efficiently. Tradies equipped with good digital too...
Running a safe site isn’t just about wearing hard hats and harnesses; it’s about effective communication and staying aware of what’s going on on-site. One of the most powerful tools is the hum...