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It’s no secret being a tradie is a very physically and mentally demanding job, with long workdays and weeks placing the body under intense physical and mental strain. 

Worker fatigue is one of the biggest hazards on-site. Fatigue can come in many different forms and be caused by a number of different factors. While fatigue may not be avoidable in today’s busy cycle, it is important we recognise the signs of fatigue and the steps we can take to reduce it.

Because at the end of the day, a tired worker is a dangerous worker. 

Responsibilities for managing fatigue 

When you are fatigued, you are less alert and aware of your environment; this can lead to an increased risk of errors, resulting in injuries or incidents on-site. 

When working on-site, it is both the Employers and the Worker’s responsibility to recognise and reduce worker fatigue. 

Employers

As an employer on-site you are required to provide a safe working environment, and that includes reducing fatigue. Here are a few strategies for ensuring everyone stays fresh: 

Workers

Everyone is personally responsible for turning up every day in the best mental and physical conditions possible so that what you do on-site doesn’t affect the health and safety of others. Here are some tips:

Practical steps for managing fatigue seasonally

Our bodies operate differently during the cooler and warmer months. During winter, fatigue levels tend to increase. With the colder temperatures, longer nights and reduced sunlight, our bodies naturally tend to shut down earlier in the day. During summer, we benefit a lot from longer days and more sunlight, however we need to consider fatigue due to hot weather and maintaining our hydration levels.

Here are a few steps you can take.

Fatigue is something that we all face in our busy work lives and it is often unavoidable.

However, it is critical we can recognise the signs of fatigue in ourselves or someone on-site and take the necessary steps to prevent fatigue-related problems from happening.

Everyone should make an effort to stay healthy… not just people working in construction. However, there is often a need for specific health checks to monitor the impacts on our health while working on construction sites.

Health monitoring is a proactive way of ensuring your team isn’t at risk in the workplace. It’s focused on the most common health risks on construction sites – hearing loss and exposure to dust (e.g. silica or asbestos dust). Health monitoring does not include general wellbeing checks or programs, since things like cholesterol checks and healthy living programs aren’t specific to construction work. 

As an Employer, health monitoring is something you need to provide for any of your team who may be exposed to hazards that may cause long-term health-related issues (e.g. silicosis, asbestosis, mesothelioma, noise-induced hearing loss). It’s intended to detect the early signs of ill health or disease, helping you monitor and protect your team from exposure to construction-related health risks. You’ll need a registered medical practitioner with experience in health monitoring to perform the medical tests.

Monitoring the health of your workers is not an alternative to effective hazard control measures, rather, it helps you understand the effectiveness of the controls being used on-site. If a worker’s health is being affected by exposure to construction-related health risks it’s best to find out as early as possible and prevent any further harm to that worker or any other team members. 

You have a legal responsibility to monitor workers’ health. Make sure you complete regular Site Reviews on the HazardCo App, as this will help you identify hazards and put an effective health monitoring plan in place.

Your HazardCo Health and Safety Advisory Support Team is available throughout the day to guide you through this – call 1800 954 702 to talk it over.

Remember, like all on-site health and safety, prevention is where it’s at. To ensure you’re meeting your legal requirements when it comes to health monitoring, get on-site with the HazardCo App, and complete an Site Review today.

We don’t need to tell you that asbestos is a big deal. The dangers of the substance are common knowledge. And knowledge is power, in this case, more so than most: the power to save lives.

With this in mind, we’d like to give you some basic information on the dangers of asbestos, where it can be found and what you can do to avoid it.

What are the different types of asbestos?

There are two types of asbestos:

Why is it so dangerous?

Inhaling asbestos fibres can cause a range of irreversible damage and diseases. Damage may occur in as little as five years or as long as 40-50 years later. Many people will not realise they have been exposed until it’s too late.

Where can it be found?

Approximately one third of all homes in Australia contain asbestos products. On 31st December 2003 asbestos was banned in Australia. Therefore any building constructed up until then has a high probability of containing asbestos. Remember, if you’re planning to renovate or partially demolish a building, have a survey done first to identify if asbestos containing material is present. If it is, contact your local Licensed asbestos removalist.

Is tere a safe way to dispose of asbestos?

Yes – as long as strict guidelines are followed. Bagging and wrapping asbestos pieces is essential in any sort of removal – and dumping asbestos-containing materials can only be done on authorised sites. We advise you to leave this to the Licensed asbestos removalists.

What more can you do?

Recognition means everything when it comes to asbestos. From sticking up posters on-site to equipping your team with knowledge of asbestos dangers through the HazardCo app, educating your workers could be the difference between life and death.

There are many asbestos awareness and training courses available online and face to face for further education and training.

 

Got Questions? Reach out to the HazardCo Health and Safety Advisory Support Team on 1800 954 702 to talk it over.

 

Asbestos Resources

WorkSafe Vic

WorkSafe QLD

SafeWork NSW

SafeWork SA

WorkSafe TAS

WorkSafe NT

Worksafe ACT

WorkSafe WA

You may have heard about the dangers of silica dust. And that it causes a progressive, irreversible, untreatable and potentially fatal disease of the lungs called silicosis.

You may know that dry sandblasting, grinding, cutting, sanding, polishing, and drilling of silica-containing materials like concrete, rock, glass, asphalt, cement and particularly engineered stone are hazardous tasks in construction. Why? Because you create silica dust that is too small to settle. It floats around undetected in the air that is breathed in by you and those around you. 

WorkSafe Victoria’s free “stonemans’ screening project” diagnosed 29% of engineered stone workers with silicosis in 2019/2020, and a similar campaign in 2021 in Queensland, Australia, diagnosed 20% of engineered stone workers with silicosis – some are young, and some are without symptoms as yet! 

Am I protected if I’m wearing a respirator? 

Tiny silica dust particles can penetrate your respirator if you aren’t careful. Make sure your respirator has been fit-tested and isn’t worn over a beard. You must also have the correct filters, as Silica dust is 100 times smaller than sand and can penetrate some filters. 

Prevention sounds like a better option! What steps can I take?

Step 1: Understand what happens when you inhale silica dust.

Knowledge will empower you to make wise choices:

Step 2: Know the silica content of your construction materials and substitute for less hazardous materials!

Are there symptoms to look out for?

Damage to the lungs from silica dust and symptoms of disease may not appear for many years. Workers may not show any symptoms, even at the point of initial diagnosis, which is why prevention and health monitoring are critical. Often workers are diagnosed during routine health monitoring, as chest x-rays may show scar tissue formation even if you are without symptoms. Silicosis symptoms may include a dry cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, fever, chest pain and unexplained weight loss. Silicosis also increases your risk for other conditions like lung cancer, chronic bronchitis, kidney disease and some auto-immune diseases. 

What if I’m experiencing some of these symptoms?

Tell your doctor about your current or previous exposure to silica dust. To rule out silicosis, respiratory questionnaires, lung function tests, chest X-rays and CT scans may be required.

Why is health monitoring important?

Early detection of silicosis, before symptoms develop, can motivate you to stop further exposure, and thereby improve your health outcome.

How do I organise health monitoring?

If you were exposed to silica dust currently or in the past, even if you wore respirators and even if you have no symptoms, you need routine health monitoring. Talk to your employer. Tell your doctor about your exposure. Engineered stone workers must see specialist occupational health doctors. Early detection is most important!

Treatment 

Treatment is limited to relieving symptoms. For instance, oxygen therapy and bronchodilators will allow you to breathe more easily. Advanced silicosis requires lung transplants.

More Information on how to protect yourself from the risk of inhaling silica dust:

It is important to understand that depending on the State/Territory you are working in, there are very likely specific requirements you need to meet to ensure you are appropriately managing the risks. WorkSafe/SafeWork have plenty of information available to learn more. We have provided a few key links below for you:

 

Call 1800 954 702 or email info@hazardco.com to get in touch with the HazardCo team.

Summer is here, are you prepared for the heat? 

Summer is here – longer days, sunshine, and the outdoors sound like the perfect conditions to get all that work done. It doesn’t matter what time of year it is, hazards and risks are forever present and summer brings with it its own risks. 

Have you thought about what you are doing to protect your team from the effects of the summer sun and heat?

 “Slip, Slop, Slap, Seek and Slide” to minimise the obvious risks of sunburn and skin cancer, but we also need to be aware of the risk of heat exhaustion, dehydration and fatigue. 

Check out this resource from the Cancer Council that gives some handy tips for working outdoors. 

Heat exhaustion

Heat exhaustion occurs when our bodies overheat from the loss of water and salt due to sweating. If left untreated it can lead to heat stroke. 

Heat stroke

Heat stroke occurs when the body is no longer able to keep itself cool causing a high body temperature of 39.4 degrees or more.

Heat rash and heat cramps are earlier stages of the onset of heat exhaustion. Knowing the signs and what to do will help prevent the onset of heat exhaustion or worse, heat stroke.

Managing the risks

 

First Aid recommendations

If someone is showing signs or symptoms of a heat-related illness, Safe Work Australia has a great resource that gives some handy tips on first aid treatment options. Click here to learn more. 

Note: Workers who have underlying medical conditions or health issues can make them more susceptible to heat related illness.

Need Help?

As always, if you have any questions or would like to discuss your work hazards, give our Health and Safety Advisory team a call on 1800 954 702. 

 

Health can often be overlooked in the construction industry, but it’s a big contributor to time off work and workers compensation costs across Australia. Both physical and mental health risks can significantly impact the health of your workers and negatively impact your business if not taken seriously.

Physical Health

Musculoskeletal injuries

Work-related musculoskeletal injuries account for the majority of workers compensation costs in Australia compared to any other type of injury. Musculoskeletal injuries account for 37% of serious claims in Australia*.

Work-related musculoskeletal injuries can arise from body stressing such as:

Common injuries for construction workers can range from sprains, strains, and bruising which can be caused by heavy lifting, repetitive movement, poor body posture, forcefulness or muscle effort, or the vibrations from continuous use of hand tools. It’s important to note that these types of injuries can occur suddenly or develop over a period of time. Symptoms of a musculoskeletal injury may be in the form of pain and/or discomfort located in and around the neck, shoulders, wrists, back, and knees. 

There are many factors to consider when it comes to managing the risks associated with body stressing, however two key areas you can focus on are:

Physical factors:

Work Organisation factors:

Prevention Tips

Some effective ways to help prevent these types of injuries include:

For more information on musculoskeletal injuries, refer to one of our recent blogs on What treatments might look like and prevention tips. 

Health Monitoring

Did you know businesses are legally required to monitor the health of their workers in certain circumstances?

On construction sites, workers can be exposed to many hazards that can cause them harm over time. Some common hazards are: 

Continuous exposure to these hazards can cause progressively worse health issues for your workers. This is why it is important to monitor your worker’s health where there may be a risk to their health. How monitoring is conducted can vary based on the hazard they may be exposed to. For example it may involve a hearing test, lung function or vision assessment. 

If your worksite exposes your workers to environments that can cause them harm, we recommend beginning the process of monitoring your worker’s health. 

Mental Health 

Workplace hazards that create risks of harm to psychological (mental) health are known as psychosocial hazards. These hazards, when excessive or prolonged, can cause serious harm.  It can have a significant impact on workers, their families and business. 

Construction workers are six times more likely to die from suicide than an accident at work. Every year 190 Australians working in the construction industry take their own lives; this means we lose a construction worker every second day to suicide. Young construction workers are two times more likely to take their own lives than other young workers. Workplaces have a legal responsibility to manage risks to mental health and wellbeing just like they do any other health and safety risk.

Psychosocial hazards can come from:  

Some work-related factors that can affect a mentally healthy work site include:

Knowing where to start can feel overwhelming but getting started doesn’t have to be. Take action to improve the mental health of your team today. Identifying risks and controlling them should be done by communicating with workers about what workplace conditions may be affecting their mental health. 

Some other tips to help build and maintain a mentally healthy work site include: 

To learn more,  we have developed a great resource on How to build a mentally healthy work site which provides useful tips to help build and maintain a mentally healthy work site.

The hidden costs to your business

There is a large range of costs that surface when someone has an incident on the job that impacts their physical or mental state, especially when they can’t return to work the next day or sometimes for weeks or months. This can have a huge impact on deadlines, bottom line, skills on-site and team dynamics.

How HazardCo can help

Get the best from your team and work safer and healthier. Some simple ways to do this include: 

If you have any further questions in regards to this topic or need more support, reach out to HazardCo and speak to one of our expert Health and Safety Advisors. You can contact us on 1800 954 702.

* Safe Work Australia reporting period of 2019 – 2020.

Work-related musculoskeletal injuries account for the majority of workers compensation costs in Australia compared to any other type of injury. Musculoskeletal injuries account for 37% of serious claims in Australia*. 

Work-related musculoskeletal injuries can arise from body stressing such as:

Common injuries for construction workers can range from sprains, strains, and contusions (bruising) which can be caused by heavy lifting, repetitive movement, poor body posture, forcefulness or muscle effort, or the vibrations from continuous use of hand tools. It’s important to note that these types of injuries can occur suddenly or develop over a period of time. Symptoms of a musculoskeletal injury may be in the form of pain and/or discomfort located in and around the neck, shoulders, wrists, back, and knees. 

What is the Musculoskeletal system?
The musculoskeletal system is made up of the bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, and cartilage of the human body. Maintaining good musculoskeletal health through prevention and early treatment can make for a long healthy career if you work in the construction industry.

When should I seek help if I suspect an injury?
As soon as you detect any pain or discomfort, inform your employer. It may mean adjusting your work for the day so as not to worsen the pain. You can seek medical assessment and treatment from a professional if the pain or discomfort is preventing you from working or if you have any concerns.

Can physiotherapy help?
Physiotherapy can provide treatment and support and will work with you to understand what work and movement can be done safely and what the recovery process may involve.  They can also assist with creating a return to work process if required, so employers know how to support you during your recovery period.

Musculoskeletal physiotherapy aims to help the patient recover from their condition more quickly through regular treatment sessions and to develop coping strategies to aid the injured worker during the recovery process and prevent secondary problems from occurring. This can be achieved by manual therapy, education, exercise rehabilitation, and finding alternative ways to accomplish your goals and live your best life. The ultimate goal of your unique treatment plan is to bring your body function back to optimal so you can continue carrying out your role in the workplace and continue to enjoy the activities you love in your personal time.

What can I do to prevent injury?
Prevention and early intervention are key to maintaining a healthy musculoskeletal system so you can carry out your day-to-day duties on-site as well as personal activities. Ensure you keep fit and healthy; regular exercise, a good diet, and sleep can all assist in keeping your body ready to perform optimally and recover faster. 


Where can I find more information?
Across Australia there is a lot of information available on this topic, we have provided a few below for you. Of course, reach out to Hazard Co and speak to one of our expert Health and Safety Advisors if you have any questions or need more support on this topic. You can contact us on 1800 954 702.

* Safe Work Australia reporting period of 2019 – 2020.

You know that old saying… “no pain, no gain’”. Well, this is not true!  Just because you work in the construction industry doesn’t mean that you need to be affected by short or long-term pain.

 

Aches and pains are some obvious symptoms of musculoskeletal disease (MSD), but have you thought about what impacts MSD is having on you outside of work in your personal life?

 

What if constantly performing the same repetitive movement all day is causing you acute pain that means you aren’t able to kick the football around with your kids after work or play golf on the weekend with your mates? Do you really want your work to impact your personal life, or your worker’s lives when there are some simple steps that could prevent it from happening?

 

As a business owner have you thought about the hidden costs?
Data shows that strains and sprains often become more problematic later in a construction worker’s career, with the largest claims in the housing construction sector. In 2017, the average compensation paid and working weeks lost for musculoskeletal injury was $13,500 (7.2 weeks lost) for muscular stress while handling objects, $12,500 (6.4 weeks lost) for muscular stress while lifting, carrying, or putting down objects, and $12,200 (5.5 weeks lost) for muscular stress with no objects being handled.

 

There is a large range of costs that surface when someone has an injury on the job, especially when they can’t return to work the next day or sometimes weeks or months. This has a huge impact on deadlines, bottom line, skills on-site, and team dynamics.

 

Risky work that can cause MSD’s can be as simple as overhead or floor level work, manual and hand intensive work.

 

Have you thought about other ways you could be working to alleviate the stress on your body? It could be as simple as:

  • doing a few warm-ups at the start of the day,
  • breaking up your tasks throughout the day,
  • taking a moment to stop and stretch throughout the task or
  • choosing a different piece of equipment.

 

It’s common practice when you workout, that you warm-up and cool down, so why is working any different?

 

Accepting the reality of MSDs helps us formulate an effective approach to combat MSDs in our industry.

 

MSD’s occur due to a number of risk factors including repetitive or sustained force high or sudden force repetitive movement sustained and/or awkward posture or exposure to vibration.We will more than likely be exposed to each of these risk factors every day on-site so it is important to always think:

  • Can I use a mechanical device or grip device to help me lift?
  • Can I reduce the weight of what needs to be lifted?
  • Can I change the height of what needs to be lifted so it is positioned above mid-thigh height and below shoulder height?
  • Can I change the tools that I use onsite?

 

Let’s do our bit and raise awareness on-site around MSD. REMEMBER – Prevention is better than the cure!

 

Next week we will give you some exercises that you can do to avoid being affected by MSD and if you are hurt, how physiotherapy can help you.

MSDs, also known as Musculoskeletal Disorders are the most common type of work-related injury in Australia, with residential construction accounting for 48% percent of all serious workers’ compensation claims in 2015-2016.

 

Musculoskeletal pain refers to pain felt in the muscles, bones, ligaments, tendons, or nerves, and you can feel this pain in just one area of the body, or throughout your whole body. The pain can range from mild, to severe enough to interfere with your day-to-day life. 

 

There are numerous risk factors to address: Time pressure, aging workforce, awkward postures for a start. We also need to change mindsets that pain and injury are unavoidable and make our younger workforce understand the cumulative nature of these problems- something that most ‘broken´ builders still working past 50 years of age know very well already.

 

It is well known that there is a range of factors that contribute to MSDs. It’s not just about a single factor such as the lifting technique (although for industries such as scaffolding and roofing handling techniques are an important factor).

 

The research firmly points to four groups of factors we need to tackle when addressing MSDs in construction:

  • Physical factors, such as:
    • Heavy loads, 
    • Lack of equipment
    • Challenging environments
    • Poor layout
    • Forces, 
    • Repetition 
    • Awkward postures 

 

  • Individual factors, such as:
    • Gender / Age
    • Fitness / Flexibility / Strength
    • Diet / Hydration
    • Weight
    • Attitude

 

  • Psychosocial factors, such as: 
    • Communication
    • Relationships
    • Stress and tension
    • Time pressure
    • Financial strain
    • Management support and the amount of control workers have over their work tasks

 

  • Work Organisation factorssuch as:
    • Work hours / Time pressure
    • Lack of help
    • No breaks
    • Poor work planning
    • Training / Skill level
    • Peaks and troughs

 

It may not surprise you that physical factors often take most of the blame and focus as their connection is easy to understand, measure and observe. There are also proven strategies to overcome physical factors such as machinery, equipment and task modifications. Combining the other factors into your approach is where the construction industry will get the most benefit. Understanding how these factors can combine and influence each other to cause problems will be crucial.

 

The most common solutions to dealing with MSD are:

  • Micropauses and position changes
  • Task rotation
  • Stretch warm-up and cool down
  • Cardio and strength fitness / flexibility
  • Stress management
  • Back care
  • Communication
  • Work planning
  • Early reporting

We will dive deeper into what treatment might look like and prevention tips, and the unseen costs associated with MSD as we continue our Musculoskeletal Series, so stay tuned!

SafeWork NSW offers a simple program called PErforM, which helps workplaces effectively manage hazardous manual tasks and reduce musculoskeletal disorders. Used by a range of industries, including construction, SafeWork holds free workshops around NSW and online events to introduce you to PErforM. You can contact advisory@hazardco.com for further details.

MSD is the most common workplace injury and cause of lost time at work, so spending time to focus on it makes good business sense.

Research has shown that the old approach of teaching a person how to lift correctly has not been effective in reducing these problems. Many workplaces pay to bring various experts into the workplace to help them address MSDs but a lot can be done inhouse by those leading the business.

 

1. Survey your workers for discomfort pain and injury using a body map:
To start a discussion around MSDs print and hang a poster of a body on a whiteboard or wall

(see body map at the end of this article). Next to the poster, provide a marker or stickers for the workers to use to place crosses on the body parts where they have experienced pain or other MSD symptoms in the past week or month. Each worker can also make a mark at the bottom of the poster to indicate that they have contributed. When there is the same number of marks at the bottom as the number of workers, or it’s been established that everyone who wants to contribute has done so, the patterns that emerge from the poster can be used for a toolbox discussion and brainstorming session.

 

2. Ask your workers to take photos of things they think contribute to discomfort, pain and injury at work:
Ask workers to take photos using their mobile phones over a two-week period. Each person (workers and managers) should take two or three photos of something that they perceive as risky or that they find triggers MSD symptoms at work. They can also take pictures of work situations or equipment that they perceive as helping to prevent MSDs. The quality of the photos doesn’t matter and they don’t have to be self-explanatory. Ask each worker or manager to provide brief explanations of their photos. To give an example of a photo of a risk, it might show the height of a ladder on a vans roof rack (which requires force and an awkward body position for workers to reach). An example of a picture of something that helps to prevent MSDs might be a photo of colleagues helping each other during a pressured time. Each person can be helped to print out their photos and stick them to a board (e.g. in a lunchroom or meeting room). Once the photo shoot is over, arrange a toolbox talk at which all the photos are on display and the topics raised can be discussed. The aim is to establish a shared understanding of what the photos represent. 

 

3. Think about the physical and mental demands on your workers
There are well-known physical and mental demands of work that lead to MSDs and lower productivity. Identify if you have any of these issues in your business:

  • Excessive physical or mental workload: not enough time to do the job, too much work, permanent time pressure, long working hours
  • Tasks do not match workers’ skills: they are too difficult or too easy
  • Tasks are monotonous and repetitive; workers have no opportunities to feel a sense of ownership of any tasks
  • Workers are required to be constantly available, e.g.to respond to emails and phone calls outside working hours
  • Many physical risks are present in the workplace, with no preventive measures

Aim to address these demands by:

  • Make sure there is enough time to do the job, workload is regularly monitored and extra resources are provided during ‘peak’ times
  • Provide tasks that allow workers to make use of and develop their skills and competencies
  • Provide tasks that are challenging and interesting; workers feel a sense of ownership of their work
  • Respect your workers’ need for a good work-life balance so there is enough time outside work to recover and recharge
  • Provide a good physical work environment, with protective measures implemented to tackle risks

 

4. Where possible get work up off the ground:
Working and handling at ground level places strain on our bodies which overtime can develop into MSDs. Take photos of tasks that require stooping and bending to complete at your workplace. Look for items that are stored on the ground. During toolbox talks discuss ways which the task can be redesigned by raising the work off the ground for example with a trestle, pallets or providing a table. If it can’t be raised, can we extend our tools or modify our position to compensate?

 

5. Where possible eliminate overhead work:
Jobs that require overhead work are 2 to 3 times more likely to result in a shoulder injury. Overhead work becomes more hazardous when the arms are elevated over 60 degrees.  Use a toolbox talk and photos to identify where overhead work is required. Where possible aim to eliminate it and where it must remain look to design alternative ways to complete it. This includes reducing the force required, using lighter and smaller tools, keeping the arm below 60 degrees and using frequent rest breaks.

It’s no secret being a tradie is a very physically and mentally demanding job, with long workdays and weeks placing the body under intense physical and mental strain.  Worker fatigue is one...
Everyone should make an effort to stay healthy… not just people working in construction. However, there is often a need for specific health checks to monitor the impacts on our health while wo...
We don’t need to tell you that asbestos is a big deal. The dangers of the substance are common knowledge. And knowledge is power, in this case, more so than most: the power to save lives. W...
You may have heard about the dangers of silica dust. And that it causes a progressive, irreversible, untreatable and potentially fatal disease of the lungs called silicosis. You may know th...
Summer is here, are you prepared for the heat?  Summer is here - longer days, sunshine, and the outdoors sound like the perfect conditions to get all that work done. It doesn't matter what ...
Health can often be overlooked in the construction industry, but it’s a big contributor to time off work and workers compensation costs across Australia. Both physical and mental health risks ...
Work-related musculoskeletal injuries account for the majority of workers compensation costs in Australia compared to any other type of injury. Musculoskeletal injuries account for 37% of seri...
[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]You know that old saying… “no pain, no gain’”. Well, this is not true!  Just because you work in the construction industry doesn’t mean that you need to be a...
[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]MSDs, also known as Musculoskeletal Disorders are the most common type of work-related injury in Australia, with residential construction accounting for 48% ...
[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]MSD is the most common workplace injury and cause of lost time at work, so spending time to focus on it makes good business sense. Research has shown that...
[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Do you know what you need to do before you demolish or refurbish a property, building or structure? Find out what the asbestos regulations mean for you befor...
[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Homes built or renovated  between 1950 and 2000 are likely to contain some asbestos. Therefore, every tradesperson is likely to come into contact with asbest...